El Salvador Government, ElectionsSV, News Highlights

PRESIDENTIAL REELECTION IN EL SALVADOR

LEER EN ESPAÑOL

During a national radio and television broadcast, on the occasion of the commemoration of the 201st anniversary of El Salvador’s independence on September 15, the president announced that he will be a candidate to seek a new term in office. The news was celebrated by most of those present as if it were a last-minute goal in a soccer match.

The first drums of reelection sounded when the Constitutional Chamber, on September 03, 2021, issued a ruling establishing the decision for a president to continue in office corresponds to the voters. “Competing again for the presidency does not de facto imply that he/she becomes elected, it only implies that the people will have among their range of options the person who at that moment exercises the presidency,” the magistrates pointed out in the ruling, a year ago.

However, it’s important to remember that on May 1, 2021, the same day that the Legislative Assembly, elected on February 28 and formed by a pro-government majority, urgently dismissed the magistrates without further study and appointed new officials, who have been widely questioned for the illegality of their appointment and their affinity with the president of the republic.

To justify his decision, President Bukele, during his speech, read a long list of countries that have presidential reelection in their legal system. “Surely more than one developed country will not agree with this decision, but they are not the ones who will decide, but the Salvadoran people,” Bukele said. He also added, “it would be a hypocritical protest because everyone has reelection.” 

However, it is not any of these countries that prohibits reelection in El Salvador, but the Constitution that Nayib Bukele himself promised to comply with and enforce on June 1, 2019, when he took office.

The Salvadoran Constitution, in force since 1983, clearly prohibits presidential reelection in at least six articles, according to constitutional lawyers. The first is Article 88: “The alternation in the exercise of the Presidency of the Republic is indispensable for the maintenance of the established form of government and political system.”

Article 131 establishes that: “It is incumbent upon the Legislative Assembly to compulsorily disqualify the President of the Republic or whoever takes his place when his constitutional term has expired and he continues in office. In such a case, if there is no person legally called to the exercise of the Presidency, it shall appoint a Provisional President.”

Article 152 establishes that: “Those who have held the office of President of the Republic for more than six months, consecutive or not, during the immediately preceding period, or within the last six months before the beginning of the presidential term, may not be candidates for President of the Republic.”

Another clear clause is Article 154: “The presidential term of office shall be five years and shall begin and end on the first day of June, without the person who has served as President being able to continue in office for one more day.”

Article 248 establishes how the Assembly may modify the Constitution, clearly stating that: “The articles of this Constitution that refer to the form and system of Government, the territory of the Republic and the alternation in the exercise of the Presidency of the Republic may not be modified in any case.”  And finally, Article 75 states that whoever promotes presidential reelection loses the right of citizenship.

Despite the illegality of such a move, polls conducted by the media and academic institutions have revealed in recent months that Bukele continues to enjoy strong approval ratings, making his reelection seem certain.

According to the digital newspaper El Faro, this level of approval has to do with social conditions and recent political history: “A country like El Salvador, with so much poverty and so many people desperate because of the direct threat of criminal groups, needs to cling to the hope that the government is doing a job that will allow them to improve their quality of life. They want to believe in that because none of the previous exercises of power gave them solutions,” the publication notes.

In addition to his popularity, Bukele has several other advantages to ensure his reelection, the main one being his almost absolute control over the public institutions responsible for the electoral processes. Simultaneously, the political opposition is practically annulled. 

Another reality is constant harassment to silence voices critical of the government. There are several media outlets and journalists with protective orders issued by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and others who have had to leave the country and are now working in exile. According to the organization Reporters without Borders, in just one year, between 2021 and 2022, El Salvador went from 82nd to 112th place in the world press freedom ranking. 

On the other hand, institutions such as the Catholic Church, which at other times maintained a courageous position and a constant denunciation of abuses of power, currently maintain a low profile. 

However, despite this inauspicious context, recognized civil society organizations have taken an active role, denouncing and demanding respect for the laws of the country. A well-known lawyer and social activist recently expressed “As already expected: the president announced electoral fraud. The fact that he is running as a presidential candidate is, by itself, an electoral fraud, since it violates the electoral rules established in the Constitution: the dictatorship is consolidated in El Salvador.” 


LA REELECCIÓN PRESIDENCIAL EN EL SALVADOR

Durante una cadena nacional de radio y televisión, con motivo de la conmemoración de 201 años de independencia de El Salvador, el pasado 15 de septiembre, el presidente anunció que será candidato para buscar un nuevo periodo en el gobierno. La noticia fue celebrada por la mayoría de los presentes, como si se tratara de un gol en el último minuto de un partido de fútbol.

Los primeros tambores de la reelección sonaron cuando la Sala de lo Constitucional, el 03 de septiembre de 2021, emitió un fallo que establece que la decisión de que un presidente continúe en el cargo recae en los electores. “Competir de nuevo por la presidencia no implica de facto que éste llegue a ser electo, implica únicamente que el pueblo tendrá entre su gama de opciones a la persona que en ese momento ejerce la presidencia”, señalaron los jueces en la sentencia, hace un año.

No obstante, hay que recordar que el 01 de mayo de 2021, el mismo día en que tomó posesión, la Asamblea Legislativa, electa el 28 de febrero y conformada por mayoría oficialista; con urgencia y sin mayor estudio destituyó a los magistrados y nombró a nuevos funcionarios, quienes han sido ampliamente cuestionados por la ilegalidad de su nombramiento y por su afinidad al presidente de la república.

En el afán de justificar su decisión, el presidente Bukele, durante su discurso, dio lectura a una larga lista de países que poseen en su ordenamiento jurídico la reelección presidencial. De seguro más de algún país desarrollado no estará de acuerdo con esta decisión, pero no son ellos los que decidirán, sino el pueblo salvadoreño”, expresó Bukele. Además añadió que “sería una protesta hipócrita porque todos ellos tienen reelección”. 

Sin embargo, no es ninguno de estos países el que prohíbe la reelección en El Salvador, sino la Constitución que el mismo Nayib Bukele prometió cumplir y hacer cumplir el 01 de junio de 2019, cuando asumió el poder.

La Constitución salvadoreña, vigente desde 1983, prohíbe la reelección presidencial, claramente en al menos seis artículos, de acuerdo con abogados constitucionalistas. El primero es el artículo 88: “La alternabilidad en el ejercicio de la Presidencia de la República es indispensable para el mantenimiento de la forma de gobierno y sistema político establecidos”.

El artículo 131 afirma que: “Corresponde a la Asamblea Legislativa desconocer obligatoriamente al Presidente de la República o al que haga sus veces cuando terminado su período constitucional continúe en el ejercicio del cargo. En tal caso, si no hubiere persona legalmente llamada para el ejercicio de la Presidencia, designará un Presidente Provisional.”

El artículo 152 establece que: “No podrán ser candidatos a Presidente de la República el que haya desempeñado la Presidencia de la República por más de seis meses, consecutivos o no, durante el período inmediato anterior, o dentro de los últimos seis meses anteriores al inicio del período presidencial.”

Otro artículo claro es el 154: “El período presidencial será de cinco años y comenzará y terminará el día primero de junio, sin que la persona que haya ejercido la Presidencia pueda continuar en sus funciones ni un día más.”

El artículo 248 establece la forma en que la Asamblea puede modificar la Constitución, pero además es claro al afirmar que: “No podrán reformarse en ningún caso los artículos de esta Constitución que se refieren a la forma y sistema de Gobierno, al territorio de la República y a la alternabilidad en el ejercicio de la Presidencia de la República.”  Y por último el artículo 75 habla que quien promueva la reelección presidencial pierde los derechos de ciudadano.

Pese a la ilegalidad de la medida, encuestas realizadas por medios de comunicación e instituciones académicas han revelado durante los últimos meses que Bukele sigue teniendo un alto nivel de aceptación popular, por lo que su reelección parece segura.

Según el diario digital El Faro periódico digital El Faro, este nivel de aprobación tiene que ver con las condiciones sociales y con la historia política reciente: “Un país como El Salvador, con tanta pobreza y tanta población desesperada por la amenaza directa de grupos criminales, necesita aferrarse a la esperanza de que el gobierno está haciendo un trabajo que les permita mejorar su calidad de vida. Quieren creer en eso porque ninguno de los anteriores ejercicios del poder les dio soluciones”, analiza la publicación.

Pero además de la aceptación popular, Bukele tiene otras ventajas, para asegurar su reelección, la principal es que ejerce un control, casi absoluto, de las instituciones públicas que tienen competencia en los procesos electorales. Al mismo tiempo que la oposición política está prácticamente anulada. 

Otra realidad es que existe un acoso constante para callar las voces críticas al gobierno, de hecho, hay varios medios y periodistas con medidas cautelares de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos y otros que han tenido que abandonar el país y ahora trabajan desde el exilio. Según la organización Reporteros sin Fronteras, en solo un año, entre 2021 y 2022, El Salvador pasó del puesto 82 al 112 en la clasificación mundial sobre la libertad de prensa. 

Por otra parte, instituciones como la iglesia católica, que en otros tiempos, mantuvo una posición valiente y una denuncia constante ante los abusos de poder, en estos momentos mantiene un bajo perfil. 

Pero, a pesar del contexto desfavorable, reconocidas organizaciones de la sociedad civil, han tomado un rol activo, denunciando y exigiendo respeto a las leyes del país. Un conocido abogado y activista social expresó recientemente “Como ya se esperaba: el presidente anunció el fraude electoral. Que él se presente como candidato presidencial es, por sí solo, un fraude electoral, pues viola las reglas electorales fijadas en la Constitución: se consolida la dictadura en El Salvador.”

Advocacy, agriculture, El Salvador Government, International Relations

The March for True Independence of the People

Yesterday, El Salvador celebrated Independence Day. Historically, many Salvadorans have used the day as a time to ask “what independence?” This was certainly the case yesterday in the Bajo Lempa. As they have in past years, communities came together and held a march down the main road through the Bajo Lempa, to demand true independence. After the march, several community leaders came together and drafted a declaration to highlight the various ways in which the Salvadoran Government has forfeited independence to other countries and international corporations.

Marchers on the main Road through the Bajo Lempa - their banner reads, "March for True Independence for the People."
Marchers on the main Road through the Bajo Lempa – their banner reads, “March for True Independence for the People.”

We translated the declaration and have posted it along with the original Spanish below.

FOR TRUE INDEPENDENCE

THE BAJO LEMPA OUR LIFE AND TERRITORY

 With the sound of tambourines, school parades, and military exercises, yesterday El Salvador celebrated 192 years of independence. For the organized communities of the Bajo Lempa, it was a day to reflect on the current state of the country and the state of independence.

 El Salvador is dependent on food purchased abroad – more than half the population consumes meat, dairy, fruits, vegetables, and grains that are imported from neighboring countries. In addition, the consumption of processed junk food (i.e. soups, artificial flavors, soft drinks, and more) is on the rise, affecting the health of the population and resulting in the loss of food sovereignty.

 With regards to the energy sector, El Salvador consumes more than 46,000 barrels of oil a day – all of which is purchased from countries such as Mexico and Venezuela. El Salvador produces energy from geothermic plants in the volcanic regions, but the Flores Administration practically gave these resources to an Italian corporation that now claim them as their own property.

Economically, El Salvador adopted the U.S. dollar in 2001 and lost its own currency (the Colon), exposing the country to international financial crises. El Salvador has also signed free trade agreements, particularly with the United States, that opened the country to the international markets and permitting transnational corporations to continue appropriating our national resources and causing many local businesses and farmers to go bankrupt. In addition, El Salvador has given international courts jurisdiction to decide trade conflicts, sacrificing sovereignty and allowing foreign corporations to violate the rights of workers and Salvadoran communities.

 The Public Private Partnership Law and the mega-projects promoted by the second Millennium Challenge Corporation, were designed by political interests of the United States and are used as instruments to manipulate and dominate the Salvadoran people, while destroying our natural resources and generating divisions and conflict between our communities.

Furthermore, the numerous transnational corporations that operate in the country with complete liberty and limited government oversight, such as telecommunications or energy companies, charge the local population high prices for important public services. These corporations work with local media to promote consumption patters that violate our cultural identity.

Transnational corporations are also engaged in the production and sale of toxic agrochemicals, and have gotten wealthy at the expense of the population and contamination of the environment. They are able to act with impunity to promote their deadly products, and they are creating confusion among the population about the recent law regulating the sale of 53 toxic substances, most of which are already banned in almost every country in the world.

 For these reasons we affirm with complete conviction that THERE IS NO INDEPENDENCE TO CELEBRATE. On the contrary, as social organizations and the organized communities of the Bajo Lempa, we take this opportunity to once again demand our legitimate right to genuine economic, political, and cultural independence. To achieve the later we are building a process to defend our territory and our lives.

 WE ARE MOBILIZING FOR THE DEFENSE OF LIFE AND TERRITORY

THAT IS HOW THE ORGANIZED COMMUNITIES OF THE BAJO LEMPA LIVE

Bajo Lempa, September 15, 2013

And the original Spanish:

POR LA VERDADERA INDEPENDENCIA

EL BAJO LEMPA DEFIENDE LA VIDA Y EL TERRITORIO

Con sonido de tambores, desfiles escolares y maniobras militares, este día los países de Centroamérica celebran 192 años de independencia. Para las comunidades organizadas del Bajo Lempa esta fecha es propicia para reflexionar sobre la situación del país y el sentido de la independencia.

El Salvador es totalmente dependiente en lo que se refiere a la alimentación, se compra en el extranjero más de la mitad de los alimentos que la población consume; carnes, lácteos, frutas, verduras y cereales, en su mayoría se importan de los países vecinos. Además, el consumo de comida chatarra: sopas instantáneas, saborizantes artificiales, bebidas gaseosas, etc. va en constante aumento, con lo que se afecta la salud de la población y se pierde soberanía.

En materia energética en el país se consumen más de 46,000 barriles de petróleo por día, todo este combustible se compra a países como México y Venezuela. También en el país se produce energía a partir del vapor que brota del subsuelo en las zonas volcánicas, pero en tiempos del gobierno de Francisco Flores, este recurso fue prácticamente regalado a una empresa italiana, que ahora lo reclama como de su propiedad.

En materia económica, El Salvador adoptó a partir del año 2001, el dólar como moneda de circulación nacional, con lo que perdió su propia moneda y ha quedado mayor expuesto a las crisis financieras internacionales. La firma de Tratados de Libre Comerció, especialmente con Estados Unidos abrió al país al mercado internacional permitiendo que empresas trasnacionales continúen apropiándose de nuestros recursos y provocando la quiebra de muchas pequeñas empresas nacionales. Por otra parte con la firma de Tratados de Libre Comercio, el país está sometido a tribunales internacionales para resolver conflictos, con lo cual se ha perdido soberanía y se vulneran los derechos de los trabajadores y las comunidades.

La ley de asocios público privados y megaproyectos como el Fomilenio II, han sido diseñados a partir de los intereses políticos de Los Estados Unidos y estos se convierten en instrumentos de manipulación y dominación de nuestro pueblo, al mismo tiempo que destruyen los recursos naturales y generan división y conflictos entre comunidades.

Además, son numerosas las empresas trasnacionales que operan en el país con total libertad o con limitados controles por parte del gobierno, como por ejemplo las empresas de telefonía o distribución de la energía eléctrica que prestan servicios a precios elevados. Además estas empresas en complicidad con grandes medios de comunicación fomentan patrones de alienación y consumo que violentan nuestra identidad cultural.

También las empresas dedicadas a la producción y comercialización de agro químicos que se han enriquecido a costa de la salud de la población y de la contaminación del medio ambiente, actúan con total impunidad promoviendo sus productos de muerte y generando confusión en la población a cerca de la reciente ley que regula la venta de 53 sustancias tóxicas, que en su mayoría están prohibidas en casi todos los países del mundo.

Por estas razones afirmamos con total convencimiento que NO HAY NINGUNA INDEPENDIENCIA QUE CELEBRAR, por el contrario las organizaciones sociales y las comunidades organizadas del Bajo Lempa, aprovechamos una vez más esta ocasión para reivindicar nuestro legitimo derecho a una verdadera independencia económica, política y cultural. La que ya estamos construyendo mediante el impulso de procesos de defensa  de nuestro territorio y de nuestra vida.

MOVILIZANDONOS POR LA DEFENSA DE LA VIDA Y EL TERRITORIO

QUE VIVAN LAS COMUNIDADES ORGANIZADAS DEL BAJO LEMPA

 Bajo Lempa, 15 de septiembre de 2013