U.S. Relations, Voices Developments, women & girls, Womens issues

PARTY IN OAKLAND THIS FRIDAY!

To our dear Bay Area friends of Voices on the Border

 You’re invited 
 to a House Party in Oakland, Friday October 7, 7pm – 9pm!

Please join us for an informal gathering with Bay Area friends of El Salvador. It will be an opportunity to hear updates about work in the communities in Usulutan and Morazan and to meet Jose Acosta, Executive Director of Voices on the Border. Pupusas, tamales and drinks starting at 7pm.  
 

Please let us know if you can attend and we’ll email you the address and directions to the location, near Lake Merritt in Oakland. Or give us a call at (510) 292-0537.

We hope to see you! *If you can’t make it but would like to make donation, visit our secure site at www.votb.org/donate

events, human rights, News Highlights, solidarity, Virtual Forum, women & girls, Womens issues

🎙️Grassroots Feminism in El Salvador – A Virtual Forum Invite

🎙️
Prevention, Attention and Activism:
Grassroots Feminism in El Salvador
 

SEPTEMBER 29  |  7PM (El Salvador) 
     Join us this week for a conversation with the Morazán Women’s Network, a regionally and internationally recognized organization for its impeccable work to promote equality and eliminate discrimination and violence against women in their region and beyond.

~ Prevention 
The work The Network is doing around youth development, drawing on both the ECHO model and popular education, to increase self-esteem and self-worth while preparing these young women to identify, confront and reject gender-based violence.

~ Attention
The work The Network is doing in the area of comprehensive accompaniment of victims and their families, with special attention to trauma-informed care programs and their real-life impacts.

~ Activism
The work The Network is doing in the area of providing legal aid, legal advocacy, and victim’s rights activism as well as the current reality of justice and the hopes for the future.
—–
You can join Thursday’s conversation via Zoom by pre-registering for an access code @ bit.ly/3cZAbQl or watch it live on Facebook.
OUR PANEL
Melida Avila – Vice President; Social Work and Healing
+
Idalia Claros – Secretary; Advocacy and Victim’s Accompaniment
+
Martiza Argueta – Treasurer; Sex-Ed and Youth Development


Simultaneous english interpretation will be available via the Zoom meeting.
A recording of the event will be made available.
El Salvador Government, ElectionsSV, News Highlights

PRESIDENTIAL REELECTION IN EL SALVADOR

LEER EN ESPAÑOL

During a national radio and television broadcast, on the occasion of the commemoration of the 201st anniversary of El Salvador’s independence on September 15, the president announced that he will be a candidate to seek a new term in office. The news was celebrated by most of those present as if it were a last-minute goal in a soccer match.

The first drums of reelection sounded when the Constitutional Chamber, on September 03, 2021, issued a ruling establishing the decision for a president to continue in office corresponds to the voters. “Competing again for the presidency does not de facto imply that he/she becomes elected, it only implies that the people will have among their range of options the person who at that moment exercises the presidency,” the magistrates pointed out in the ruling, a year ago.

However, it’s important to remember that on May 1, 2021, the same day that the Legislative Assembly, elected on February 28 and formed by a pro-government majority, urgently dismissed the magistrates without further study and appointed new officials, who have been widely questioned for the illegality of their appointment and their affinity with the president of the republic.

To justify his decision, President Bukele, during his speech, read a long list of countries that have presidential reelection in their legal system. “Surely more than one developed country will not agree with this decision, but they are not the ones who will decide, but the Salvadoran people,” Bukele said. He also added, “it would be a hypocritical protest because everyone has reelection.” 

However, it is not any of these countries that prohibits reelection in El Salvador, but the Constitution that Nayib Bukele himself promised to comply with and enforce on June 1, 2019, when he took office.

The Salvadoran Constitution, in force since 1983, clearly prohibits presidential reelection in at least six articles, according to constitutional lawyers. The first is Article 88: “The alternation in the exercise of the Presidency of the Republic is indispensable for the maintenance of the established form of government and political system.”

Article 131 establishes that: “It is incumbent upon the Legislative Assembly to compulsorily disqualify the President of the Republic or whoever takes his place when his constitutional term has expired and he continues in office. In such a case, if there is no person legally called to the exercise of the Presidency, it shall appoint a Provisional President.”

Article 152 establishes that: “Those who have held the office of President of the Republic for more than six months, consecutive or not, during the immediately preceding period, or within the last six months before the beginning of the presidential term, may not be candidates for President of the Republic.”

Another clear clause is Article 154: “The presidential term of office shall be five years and shall begin and end on the first day of June, without the person who has served as President being able to continue in office for one more day.”

Article 248 establishes how the Assembly may modify the Constitution, clearly stating that: “The articles of this Constitution that refer to the form and system of Government, the territory of the Republic and the alternation in the exercise of the Presidency of the Republic may not be modified in any case.”  And finally, Article 75 states that whoever promotes presidential reelection loses the right of citizenship.

Despite the illegality of such a move, polls conducted by the media and academic institutions have revealed in recent months that Bukele continues to enjoy strong approval ratings, making his reelection seem certain.

According to the digital newspaper El Faro, this level of approval has to do with social conditions and recent political history: “A country like El Salvador, with so much poverty and so many people desperate because of the direct threat of criminal groups, needs to cling to the hope that the government is doing a job that will allow them to improve their quality of life. They want to believe in that because none of the previous exercises of power gave them solutions,” the publication notes.

In addition to his popularity, Bukele has several other advantages to ensure his reelection, the main one being his almost absolute control over the public institutions responsible for the electoral processes. Simultaneously, the political opposition is practically annulled. 

Another reality is constant harassment to silence voices critical of the government. There are several media outlets and journalists with protective orders issued by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and others who have had to leave the country and are now working in exile. According to the organization Reporters without Borders, in just one year, between 2021 and 2022, El Salvador went from 82nd to 112th place in the world press freedom ranking. 

On the other hand, institutions such as the Catholic Church, which at other times maintained a courageous position and a constant denunciation of abuses of power, currently maintain a low profile. 

However, despite this inauspicious context, recognized civil society organizations have taken an active role, denouncing and demanding respect for the laws of the country. A well-known lawyer and social activist recently expressed “As already expected: the president announced electoral fraud. The fact that he is running as a presidential candidate is, by itself, an electoral fraud, since it violates the electoral rules established in the Constitution: the dictatorship is consolidated in El Salvador.” 


LA REELECCIÓN PRESIDENCIAL EN EL SALVADOR

Durante una cadena nacional de radio y televisión, con motivo de la conmemoración de 201 años de independencia de El Salvador, el pasado 15 de septiembre, el presidente anunció que será candidato para buscar un nuevo periodo en el gobierno. La noticia fue celebrada por la mayoría de los presentes, como si se tratara de un gol en el último minuto de un partido de fútbol.

Los primeros tambores de la reelección sonaron cuando la Sala de lo Constitucional, el 03 de septiembre de 2021, emitió un fallo que establece que la decisión de que un presidente continúe en el cargo recae en los electores. “Competir de nuevo por la presidencia no implica de facto que éste llegue a ser electo, implica únicamente que el pueblo tendrá entre su gama de opciones a la persona que en ese momento ejerce la presidencia”, señalaron los jueces en la sentencia, hace un año.

No obstante, hay que recordar que el 01 de mayo de 2021, el mismo día en que tomó posesión, la Asamblea Legislativa, electa el 28 de febrero y conformada por mayoría oficialista; con urgencia y sin mayor estudio destituyó a los magistrados y nombró a nuevos funcionarios, quienes han sido ampliamente cuestionados por la ilegalidad de su nombramiento y por su afinidad al presidente de la república.

En el afán de justificar su decisión, el presidente Bukele, durante su discurso, dio lectura a una larga lista de países que poseen en su ordenamiento jurídico la reelección presidencial. De seguro más de algún país desarrollado no estará de acuerdo con esta decisión, pero no son ellos los que decidirán, sino el pueblo salvadoreño”, expresó Bukele. Además añadió que “sería una protesta hipócrita porque todos ellos tienen reelección”. 

Sin embargo, no es ninguno de estos países el que prohíbe la reelección en El Salvador, sino la Constitución que el mismo Nayib Bukele prometió cumplir y hacer cumplir el 01 de junio de 2019, cuando asumió el poder.

La Constitución salvadoreña, vigente desde 1983, prohíbe la reelección presidencial, claramente en al menos seis artículos, de acuerdo con abogados constitucionalistas. El primero es el artículo 88: “La alternabilidad en el ejercicio de la Presidencia de la República es indispensable para el mantenimiento de la forma de gobierno y sistema político establecidos”.

El artículo 131 afirma que: “Corresponde a la Asamblea Legislativa desconocer obligatoriamente al Presidente de la República o al que haga sus veces cuando terminado su período constitucional continúe en el ejercicio del cargo. En tal caso, si no hubiere persona legalmente llamada para el ejercicio de la Presidencia, designará un Presidente Provisional.”

El artículo 152 establece que: “No podrán ser candidatos a Presidente de la República el que haya desempeñado la Presidencia de la República por más de seis meses, consecutivos o no, durante el período inmediato anterior, o dentro de los últimos seis meses anteriores al inicio del período presidencial.”

Otro artículo claro es el 154: “El período presidencial será de cinco años y comenzará y terminará el día primero de junio, sin que la persona que haya ejercido la Presidencia pueda continuar en sus funciones ni un día más.”

El artículo 248 establece la forma en que la Asamblea puede modificar la Constitución, pero además es claro al afirmar que: “No podrán reformarse en ningún caso los artículos de esta Constitución que se refieren a la forma y sistema de Gobierno, al territorio de la República y a la alternabilidad en el ejercicio de la Presidencia de la República.”  Y por último el artículo 75 habla que quien promueva la reelección presidencial pierde los derechos de ciudadano.

Pese a la ilegalidad de la medida, encuestas realizadas por medios de comunicación e instituciones académicas han revelado durante los últimos meses que Bukele sigue teniendo un alto nivel de aceptación popular, por lo que su reelección parece segura.

Según el diario digital El Faro periódico digital El Faro, este nivel de aprobación tiene que ver con las condiciones sociales y con la historia política reciente: “Un país como El Salvador, con tanta pobreza y tanta población desesperada por la amenaza directa de grupos criminales, necesita aferrarse a la esperanza de que el gobierno está haciendo un trabajo que les permita mejorar su calidad de vida. Quieren creer en eso porque ninguno de los anteriores ejercicios del poder les dio soluciones”, analiza la publicación.

Pero además de la aceptación popular, Bukele tiene otras ventajas, para asegurar su reelección, la principal es que ejerce un control, casi absoluto, de las instituciones públicas que tienen competencia en los procesos electorales. Al mismo tiempo que la oposición política está prácticamente anulada. 

Otra realidad es que existe un acoso constante para callar las voces críticas al gobierno, de hecho, hay varios medios y periodistas con medidas cautelares de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos y otros que han tenido que abandonar el país y ahora trabajan desde el exilio. Según la organización Reporteros sin Fronteras, en solo un año, entre 2021 y 2022, El Salvador pasó del puesto 82 al 112 en la clasificación mundial sobre la libertad de prensa. 

Por otra parte, instituciones como la iglesia católica, que en otros tiempos, mantuvo una posición valiente y una denuncia constante ante los abusos de poder, en estos momentos mantiene un bajo perfil. 

Pero, a pesar del contexto desfavorable, reconocidas organizaciones de la sociedad civil, han tomado un rol activo, denunciando y exigiendo respeto a las leyes del país. Un conocido abogado y activista social expresó recientemente “Como ya se esperaba: el presidente anunció el fraude electoral. Que él se presente como candidato presidencial es, por sí solo, un fraude electoral, pues viola las reglas electorales fijadas en la Constitución: se consolida la dictadura en El Salvador.”

International Relations, News Highlights, Quarterly Report, solidarity, Voices Developments, Womens issues

Second Quarter Report of 2022

From education to the environment to the empowerment of girls and youth, VOICES continues to work actively for the just development of El Salvador’s most marginalized peoples. 

Read about this and more in our latest quarterly report! 


Desde la educación, al MedioAmbiente hasta al empoderamiento de las niñas y jovenes, VOICES sigue trabajando activamente por el desarrollo justo de los pueblos más marginados de El Salvador.

Lea sobre esto y más, en nuestro último informe trimestral!

International Relations, News Highlights, Quarterly Report, solidarity, Voices Developments, Womens issues

First Quarter Report of 2022

This first quarter of 2022 Voices on the Border been very busy, we’ve helped to protected schools, students and teachers, bring youth initiatives together, expand our accompaniment, train teachers, support victims of violence in their healing process and even hosted a successful virtual Solidarity Festival.

CLICK HERE to read more!


Este primer trimestre de 2022 Voces en la Frontera ha estado muy ocupado, hemos ayudado a proteger escuelas, a reunir iniciativas juveniles, a ampliar nuestro acompañamiento, a formar a profesores, a apoyar a las víctimas de la violencia en su proceso de curación e incluso a organizar un exitoso Festival Solidario virtual.

HAGA CLIC AQUÍ para leer más!

education, human rights, youth, Youth Development

Mejores Escuelas, Mejores Futuros

Porque creemos que la educación es un elemento clave para acabar con la pobreza, nos esforzamos por mejorar la calidad no sólo de las competencias de los profesores y el equipamiento, sino también por mejorar las escuelas para que los niños quieran seguir estudiando.

Vea el siguiente vídeo y conocer cómo un poco hace mucho por las comunidades más vulnerables y olvidadas.

Gracias al apoyo del Grupo Santuario de Baja de Sur, de Palo Alto, California, por financiar este proyecto.

Better Schools, Brighter Futures
Because we believe that education is a key element in ending poverty, we strive to improve the quality not only of teachers’ skills and equipment, but also to improve infrastructure so that children will want to stay in school.

Watch this video and learn how a little goes a long way for the most vulnerable and neglected communities.

Thank you to the support of the South Bay Sanctuary Covenant Group of Palo Alto, California for funding this project.